TEACH21C

A network for connecting 21st Century Educators around the world

Lagkadikia Child Friendly Spaces

salam-lagkadikia

There is no place for children here. No place for them to play and Laith is so energetic, we always have to keep an eye and entertain him”(Carvalho, Mouzourakis, Pierigh, ECRE, 2016).

These are the words from Salam, pictured above. Similar to Nisrine and her 5 children (see context), Salam and his wife Ghofram have fled the crisis in Syria and taken refuge in Lagkadikia with their young child Laith. Their only hope is to give their son a safe and bright future.

However, the harsh reality for Laith and the other vulnerable young refugee children, who make up half of the population in this camp, is that currently there is no safe place to play. Nothing for the children to do.

UNHCR have future plans to create a school for the Lagkadikia camp. Project Philoxenia aims to work in collaboration with UNHCR to bring this plan to fruition, by developing the Lagkadikia Child Friendly Space. The Lagkadikia Child Friendly Space will be a safe, nurturing and supportive place where boys and girls aged 4 – 11, can go to make new friends, play, socialise, learn, express themselves and heal as they rebuild their lives. It is our hope to restore some normalcy, routines and structures to childrens’ lives and help them develop goals for the future.

 

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